Final Program for Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit

The Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit at Gun Lake Pottawatomi starts with hands-on traditional technology workshops on Wednesday morning, April 19th and runs through Sunday, April 23rd, featuring numerous workshops on topics ranging from seed keeping to conservation planning to cooking in clay pots on wood fires.

Click the link below to download the final event program, and check out the main event webpage for registration and additional event information.

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Early Registration for Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit Ends March 20th

Register now for the Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit that will be held April 19-23 at Gun Lake Pottawatomi.  This year’s event features even more hands-on activities, including workshops on making traditional tools on Wednesday morning, April 19th.

#foodsummit  #gunlake  #IndianAg

Here’s the draft agenda:

Food Sovereignty Symposium & Festival

The Food Sovereignty Symposium & Festival is being held in Madison, WI on March 10-12 with additional events throughout that week.  The event is a collaboration among the Intertribal Agriculture Council, Family Farm Defenders, the Wisconsin Union and it’s new WUD Cuisine Committee, and an assortment of UW-Madison departments and centers, including the Center for Integrated System (CIAS), the Great Lakes Indigenous Law Center,  and the Nelson Institute.

Several of the amazing meals do require tickets, but the symposium sessions are free of charge.

USDA Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Programs

USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is currently accepting applications for their Farmers Market Promotion Program (FMPP) and Local Food Promotion Program (LFPP) to support local and regional food systems.  Applications for both program applications are due March 27, 2017.

FMPP grants fund farmer-to consumer direct marketing projects such as farmers markets, community-supported agriculture programs, roadside stands, and agritourism.  $13 million is available for FMPP, and the minimum and maximum awards are $50,000 and $500,000.

LFPP grants fund local and regional food business enterprises that serve as intermediaries to process, distribute, aggregate, and store locally or regionally produced food products. Projects also provide technical assistance and outreach, including planning grants for local food businesses.  $13 million is also available for LFPP for minimum and maximum awards ranging between $25,000 to $500,000.

Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit at Gun Lake

We will be hosting the 2016 Spring Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit with the Gun Lake Pottawatomi Tribe at their Jijak facility on April 19-23, 2017.  Save-the-date is attached.  Please visit our event webpage to share feedback on what you’d like to see as part of this event, which will again feature a concurrent youth summit.

We’re also accepting chef applications.  Applications received prior to November 30th will receive priority.

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Event Summary – Red Lake Food Summit

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Red Lake

Following successful past regional food summits at Oneida and, most recently, Gun Lake Pottawatomi’s Jijak Camp this past April, Red Lake volunteered the Fall 2016 Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit in conjunction with the Intertribal Agriculture Council from September 16-17 with pre-summit workshops on the 14th and 15th.

The pre-summit workshops featured training on federal vendor, organic, and GAP (Good Agricultural Practices) certifications before offering opportunity to tour some of Red Lake’s operations, like the Red Lake Fisheries and Red Lake Nation Foods warehouse.

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Two new Tribal facilities, the Tribal administration building and the Red Lake Nation College that served as home base for the summit, provided an amazing setting, directly on the shores of Red Lake, with the directly adjacent powwow grounds offering excellent outdoor gathering, cooking, and instructional space.  Friday morning workshops included 1)  “Harvesting from the Forest” that covered in-depth foraging and fall preparations for spring tree tapping season and 2) “Soil Health” led by USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) and University of Minnesota-Crookston.

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Behind-the-scenes efforts on Friday morning also included a partnership with Red Lake’s Elderly Nutrition Program (ENP) program, which was able to serve lunch featuring buffalo stew donated by the Intertribal Buffalo Council (ITBC) and homemade biscuits prepared by the Onondaga Nation chefs.

Similar to the Spring 2016 Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit at Jijak, this event featured Native chefs preparing Indigenous foods for all meals.  Brian Yazzie and Tashia Hart from the Sioux Chef led a team that also included Neftalí Duran, the Onondaga Nation, and students and instructors from United Tribes Technical College’s (UTTC) culinary program.

Friday afternoon workshops covered 1) “Grazing 101” with instruction from NRCS, Society for Range Management (SRM), and ITBC and 2) “Indigenous Seed Keeping” led by Rowen White and Zach Paige.

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Several vendors, including IAC’s Mobile Farmers Market, setup throughout the event, offering a variety of Indigenous foods and outreach on efforts relating to Tribal food and agriculture.

Saturday’s “Intertribal Foods Festival” combined continuing education with morning presentations before the event shifted outside to demonstrations and hands-on activities.  The Sioux Chef, Sean Sherman, highlighted the top Native chef lineup that served lunch featuring small plates  while hominy continued cooking in kettles, wild rice was traditionally finished, and whitefish smoked for hours.

Traditional botagens (the large pestle and mortar pictured above) seed cleaning were interspersed with a presentation from Sean Sherman, continued cooking, and a sapping talking circle complete with equipment demonstrations.  The clouds then cleared in mid-afternoon, providing a perfect setting for husking and braiding heirloom corn.

Partnership and support from the Red Lake Nation and its community members helped make the event so special and memorable.  Red Lake hunters contributed multiple deer, including the grilled steaks (above) and the Red Lake Local Food Initiative contributed an assortment of vegetables to compliment the walleye and whitefish donated by the Red Lake Fishery.  The Onondaga Nation further supplemented that fish with a huge cooler of New York fish.

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The Intertribal Agriculture Council offers a huge thank you to the Red Lake Nation and all of our teachers, chefs, sponsors, and participants.  We would specifically like to thank our sponsoring organizations, including Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, the NB3 Foundation, First Nations Development Institute, the Blanden Foundation, the Onondaga Nation, and NRCS.